Rounding Out the Wine Stopper 1st Dozen

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   Posted by: BJ Johnson in photography

Wrapping up the first Art Glass Wine Stopper set, are two geometrics and four spheres. The lower three are a series; all made from the same initial structure. There is a fourth in that series that is 50% larger. He hasn't been cold-worked yet but he's stunning!

Just retrieved the two large geometricals and six spheres that have been in the annealer since my solo session on Tuesday and they're way better than I thought they may turn out to be while I was making them.
When the glass is hot, its color changes significantly; most times such that it is unrecognizable as to what it is. Some blues go brown. Greens go yellow or red. Whites go faint yellow. Yellows all but disappear.
Glass colors are made by varying elements within the compound. One particularly captivating color of red is made by the presence of Gold. They only appear that way in a certain range of temperatures. Get the work hot enough and all colors glow at the same color temperature. 2,200°F is best described as fluorescent orange. You are unsure of which color is which after a while but the work is beautiful, nonetheless; sometimes more beautiful. Often, you wish that the colors of the piece you are working on would stay as they appear when hot but, unless you are working in yellows, oranges and reds, it never happens. Even then, they change once the piece cools. Still beautiful—just different. The gaffer and assistant are the only ones who know the work in this fleeting, ephemeral state. That makes working with them a very special experience that few, if any, can know or share.


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